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Facts and Resources: Unaccompanied Children in the U.S.

Resources about the increase of unaccompanied children entering the United States and ways PTAs can welcome and support these children and their families and sponsors.

PTA Resources

Unaccompanied Children in the U.S.: Fact Sheet and Resources

Answers to common questions about the increase of unaccompanied children entering the United States from Central America including federal and state responsibilities, the anticipated impact on public schools and federal resources available to address this impact and the federal response to date.

Connecting with Children & Families who Recently Immigrated: Putting PTA’s National Standards for Family-School Partnerships into Action

Using PTA’s National Standards for Family-School Partnerships as a guide, here are some ways local PTAs can welcome and support all children, families and sponsors of children who recently immigrated to the United States. This resource also contains national and community resources that can provide PTAs with valuable supports and services to engage families and sponsors.

Policy Briefing: Increase of Unaccompanied Children Entering the United States

A webinar for state and local PTA leadership on the recent increase of unaccompanied children entering the United States. This resource provides an overview of the issue including relevant federal laws, federal and state impact, PTA positions, and available PTA resources.

About Unaccompanied Children

National PTA believes that all children residing in the United States, regardless of their immigration status, have the right of access to a quality public education, adequate food and shelter, and basic health care services.

Federal, state and local entities have a responsibility to contribute to the well-being of children by offering health care and other social services needed in their areas. Denying these services to children, regardless of their citizenship status, will endanger communities and create serious health and social concerns.

The United States has seen a recent increase in the number of children arriving at the Southwest border unaccompanied by an adult. These children are placed in the care of an approved sponsor—usually a family member or friend—while they await immigration hearings, which can take months or even years. While in the care of a sponsor, the children enroll in local schools.

Questions? Contact Jessica Seitz